Abbas Alwishah
Abbas Alwishah
Establishing the relationships where information is being passed back and forth freely helps make better end products.

Abbas Alwishah’s journey to becoming an engineer at TE is an inspiring one. When he was 9 years old, he and his family escaped danger in Iraq after his father supported democratic reforms after the Persian Gulf War in 1991. Abbas spent a year in a refugee camp in Saudi Arabia before coming to the United States. Throughout the rest of his youth and during his college years, Abbas studied hard and became passionate about engineering. Today, he specializes in data connectivity solutions for the truck, bus, and off-road industries.

Abbas’ experiences have molded him into a man that is determined to make a difference in the world. At TE, Abbas works on projects that are designed to make heavy-duty vehicles operate safer, sustainable, productive and more connected. He spends a lot of his time mentoring young engineers so that they can be successful. Abbas also makes a difference in his free time. He created Michigan Futball Club (FC), a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization, as a way to prevent neighborhood kids from using drugs, dropping out of school or turning to a life of crime. Many of the children involved in the club include refugees from the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.

1

What is your area of expertise?

Data Connectivity. I understand the full system and can pinpoint which products are needed for certain customer requirements. For example, if a customer were to tell me that they needed a high-definition camera on a heavy vehicle that works with no delay or latency, I would consider all the individual components that make up the entire system. Items like the connectors, cable assemblies, antennas, processors, cameras, and display make up the system and must work together. I’m able to look at what is needed for the entire system and make recommendations so that the finished product works properly and meets the customer’s requirements, within the project’s budget.

2

What are some important skills that engineers need to be successful?

Building relationships and communicating. As young engineers come into TE, I tell them to work to build strong relationships with our customers. It’s important to keep communicating throughout the design process and to consider all the design options available. As an engineer, you don’t want to do a data dump of technical information onto the customer and then move on. Instead, work with and challenge the customer. Ask about long term technology changes that could take place in the future and how the changes might impact their designs. You want to make sure that their design will not be obsolete in a short time. By challenging the customer and making them think about the technologies that are available not only today, but in the future, their design will be better and relevant longer. Establishing the relationships where information is being passed back and forth freely helps make better end products. 

3

What are the biggest challenges to your customers right now?

It all depends on the type of customer. For TE Industrial & Commercial Transportation, we have the trucking industry, construction industry, and agricultural industry customers. Customers building on-highway trucks are facing challenges with newer technologies, such as vehicle-to-vehicle communications, vehicle-to-infrastructure communications, cloud computing, lane assist, and blind spot detection. The connectivity products that go into these technologies must withstand high vibration and over a million miles of operation. For off-highway and construction customers, it is mostly implementing technologies that make the machines run reliably and efficiently. Connectivity challenges for off-highway customers almost always involve vibration and thermal shock. For farming machinery, customers want more productive operations. The treatment of weeds and application of pesticides must be precise so that the farmer can yield the most crops possible. Customers across all our industries want to enable data to be collected and analyzed for more insight into operations.

4

What do you enjoy most about your work? Why?

I enjoy the challenge. Without a challenge I would be bored. Over the years, I have seen myself develop and now I have the opportunity to help develop new engineers. I’m here to support and provide guidance to them to make sure that they are reaching their goals and TE’s goals. I’m the type of person that doesn’t like to leave anything on the table for the competition. I like to win every business opportunity, especially the big ones. Winning is my drive and every day I’m working to build up my team so that they can establish good relationships with customers. It takes a lot of hard work, careful analysis, and good communication to be successful in engineering. It’s that challenge that I look forward to every day I go to the office.

5

Where do you think the truck, bus, and off-road industries will be in 10-20 years from now?

Automation and autonomous driving is going to come into play. Construction and mining equipment is going to be more automated and smarter and operators will be able to work remotely. On highway vehicles will achieve level 4 (high automation) in the next 3 to 5 years and within 10 to 15 years entire fleets will reach level 5 (full automation). I also think that operations will become much more efficient. For example, in the agricultural industry, machines will be able to understand the weather patterns and then adapt and calculate treatments down to the last second and last plant in a field. Trucking will be transformed, as trucks will be able to make deliveries across the country in a day due to highly efficient engines and the ability to run 24 hours. I feel that the advancements will not happen overnight, but rather in a gradual progression.

6

What inspires you?

My son (Elias) and the world that I live in. I believe that you are on this earth for a reason and that when you leave, you want to have done something. I want to leave an impact on society as a whole for kids, engineers, and technology.  For example, when a vehicle goes by, it makes me proud to know that I designed a system that is on it. I feel that the work I’m doing with TE is making the world better, by reducing the amount of resources needed for vehicles to run, also leading to a smarter and more connected world. Knowing that I am helping to make the world a little bit better for my son and for the next generation inspires me to keep pushing forward.

Abbas Alwishah
Abbas Alwishah
Establishing the relationships where information is being passed back and forth freely helps make better end products.

Abbas Alwishah’s journey to becoming an engineer at TE is an inspiring one. When he was 9 years old, he and his family escaped danger in Iraq after his father supported democratic reforms after the Persian Gulf War in 1991. Abbas spent a year in a refugee camp in Saudi Arabia before coming to the United States. Throughout the rest of his youth and during his college years, Abbas studied hard and became passionate about engineering. Today, he specializes in data connectivity solutions for the truck, bus, and off-road industries.

Abbas’ experiences have molded him into a man that is determined to make a difference in the world. At TE, Abbas works on projects that are designed to make heavy-duty vehicles operate safer, sustainable, productive and more connected. He spends a lot of his time mentoring young engineers so that they can be successful. Abbas also makes a difference in his free time. He created Michigan Futball Club (FC), a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization, as a way to prevent neighborhood kids from using drugs, dropping out of school or turning to a life of crime. Many of the children involved in the club include refugees from the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America.

1

What is your area of expertise?

Data Connectivity. I understand the full system and can pinpoint which products are needed for certain customer requirements. For example, if a customer were to tell me that they needed a high-definition camera on a heavy vehicle that works with no delay or latency, I would consider all the individual components that make up the entire system. Items like the connectors, cable assemblies, antennas, processors, cameras, and display make up the system and must work together. I’m able to look at what is needed for the entire system and make recommendations so that the finished product works properly and meets the customer’s requirements, within the project’s budget.

2

What are some important skills that engineers need to be successful?

Building relationships and communicating. As young engineers come into TE, I tell them to work to build strong relationships with our customers. It’s important to keep communicating throughout the design process and to consider all the design options available. As an engineer, you don’t want to do a data dump of technical information onto the customer and then move on. Instead, work with and challenge the customer. Ask about long term technology changes that could take place in the future and how the changes might impact their designs. You want to make sure that their design will not be obsolete in a short time. By challenging the customer and making them think about the technologies that are available not only today, but in the future, their design will be better and relevant longer. Establishing the relationships where information is being passed back and forth freely helps make better end products. 

3

What are the biggest challenges to your customers right now?

It all depends on the type of customer. For TE Industrial & Commercial Transportation, we have the trucking industry, construction industry, and agricultural industry customers. Customers building on-highway trucks are facing challenges with newer technologies, such as vehicle-to-vehicle communications, vehicle-to-infrastructure communications, cloud computing, lane assist, and blind spot detection. The connectivity products that go into these technologies must withstand high vibration and over a million miles of operation. For off-highway and construction customers, it is mostly implementing technologies that make the machines run reliably and efficiently. Connectivity challenges for off-highway customers almost always involve vibration and thermal shock. For farming machinery, customers want more productive operations. The treatment of weeds and application of pesticides must be precise so that the farmer can yield the most crops possible. Customers across all our industries want to enable data to be collected and analyzed for more insight into operations.

4

What do you enjoy most about your work? Why?

I enjoy the challenge. Without a challenge I would be bored. Over the years, I have seen myself develop and now I have the opportunity to help develop new engineers. I’m here to support and provide guidance to them to make sure that they are reaching their goals and TE’s goals. I’m the type of person that doesn’t like to leave anything on the table for the competition. I like to win every business opportunity, especially the big ones. Winning is my drive and every day I’m working to build up my team so that they can establish good relationships with customers. It takes a lot of hard work, careful analysis, and good communication to be successful in engineering. It’s that challenge that I look forward to every day I go to the office.

5

Where do you think the truck, bus, and off-road industries will be in 10-20 years from now?

Automation and autonomous driving is going to come into play. Construction and mining equipment is going to be more automated and smarter and operators will be able to work remotely. On highway vehicles will achieve level 4 (high automation) in the next 3 to 5 years and within 10 to 15 years entire fleets will reach level 5 (full automation). I also think that operations will become much more efficient. For example, in the agricultural industry, machines will be able to understand the weather patterns and then adapt and calculate treatments down to the last second and last plant in a field. Trucking will be transformed, as trucks will be able to make deliveries across the country in a day due to highly efficient engines and the ability to run 24 hours. I feel that the advancements will not happen overnight, but rather in a gradual progression.

6

What inspires you?

My son (Elias) and the world that I live in. I believe that you are on this earth for a reason and that when you leave, you want to have done something. I want to leave an impact on society as a whole for kids, engineers, and technology.  For example, when a vehicle goes by, it makes me proud to know that I designed a system that is on it. I feel that the work I’m doing with TE is making the world better, by reducing the amount of resources needed for vehicles to run, also leading to a smarter and more connected world. Knowing that I am helping to make the world a little bit better for my son and for the next generation inspires me to keep pushing forward.