Wireless “Ghost” Connections make data and power transmissions without physical contact a reality

Over 100 years ago when Nikola Tesla illuminated light bulbs that he held in his hands, it looked like a magic trick. Today, the principle of induction used by the Tesla Coil to make electrons flow wirelessly across space—the same principle used by electric toothbrush chargers and wireless charging pads for smart phones—is being employed for more demanding applications. In fact, recent developments in wireless connectivity are giving military product designers new options for transmitting power or signals through air or water without the need for a direct physical connection. Neither magic nor science fiction, wireless connection technology is now a real possibility in a wide range of applications where a wired connection was previously difficult or impossible to implement.

Wireless “Ghost” Connections make data and power transmissions without physical contact a reality

Over 100 years ago when Nikola Tesla illuminated light bulbs that he held in his hands, it looked like a magic trick. Today, the principle of induction used by the Tesla Coil to make electrons flow wirelessly across space—the same principle used by electric toothbrush chargers and wireless charging pads for smart phones—is being employed for more demanding applications. In fact, recent developments in wireless connectivity are giving military product designers new options for transmitting power or signals through air or water without the need for a direct physical connection. Neither magic nor science fiction, wireless connection technology is now a real possibility in a wide range of applications where a wired connection was previously difficult or impossible to implement.