Tom Medina, Engineering Fellow, Medical
Tom Medina, Engineering Fellow, Medical
The challenge is keeping in mind all the factors driving innovation in medical devices...We look at these factors when thinking about the clinical value we can help customers achieve.

Tom focuses on the big picture while minding the details that matter. Inspired by the people he works alongside, he is energized by hard effort, creativity, esprit de corps, and commitment to achieving business advantages. He leads by guiding his team in confronting tough problems that require a concerted, balanced approach to sorting and ordering chaos into actionable plans built around priorities and into bite-sized tasks that address opportunities. To keep projects on target, he partners with customers and his engineers to understand the needs of all stakeholders and advocates the use of tools that help the team manage and evaluate these needs. This approach enables the team to address the requirements most critical to achieving expected quality and customer satisfaction. A first-generation Trekkie who's watched every Apollo mission, Tom became an engineer so he could play a role in creating a safer, smarter future. At TE, he is enabling customers to develop medical devices for life-saving therapies that are improving patient health and transforming the healthcare industry.

1

Which connectivity challenges are you working to solve?

I'm working on solutions for next-generation medical devices. These will increasingly feature more functionality and deliver spectrum of advantages: Offering higher resolution, addressing smaller anatomical structures, enabling easier use, improving patient safety, and reducing procedure cost. I lead a small team of engineers solving for these advantages in powered surgical instruments, endoscopes, active catheters, and wearable defibrillator devices.

 

I am focused on interventional cardiac imaging and mapping devices. The scope of work includes the integration of micro-electronic components, sensors, cabling, circuits and connectors into devices; all of which are driving miniaturization, limited use (disposable), and larger scale production.

2

What are some concerns to address when designing medical devices?

A key consideration is the cost of healthcare. Minimally invasive procedures generate small incisions which are less stressful to the body and allow for shorter hospital stays. This has created opportunities for developing new medical devices that can similarly address a broad spectrum of diagnostics and therapies. These devices can capture images, take biometric data, remove or ablate tissue, repair organs, deploy implants, and in most cases, enable physicians to perform combinations of these procedures.

 

Many medical devices require integrated components for tracking and navigation. To function as expected, these must be developed for compatibility with human anatomy – microscale features – and to qualify for healthcare reimbursements, enable low-cost and highly successful outcomes. The challenge is keeping in mind all the factors driving innovation in medical devices. This means keep top-of-mind the challenges, such as how clinical procedures are evolving, how device requirements are changing, and which new materials, fabrication methods, and sensors offer the potential to enable new disruptive therapies. We look at these factors when thinking about the clinical value we can help customers achieve.

3

Which technology trends are you watching?

There is a growing interest in displacing piezoelectric imaging transducers with MEMS-based sensors offering integrated functionality. These sensors can lower cost and improve performance. One current initiative is enabling us to develop new approaches for connecting a composite cable structure. There is a lot to learn about this type of interconnection. We are open to exploring alternative approaches with an aim toward optimizing consistency, durability, and manufacturability.

 

We are also investigating the use of 3D-printed circuits as an alternative to conventional solder, MID, and flex-circuit based solutions. There are clear advantages in using this technology when assembling micro-scale components, particularly because additive manufacturing enables new design options, lower cost, and large-scale manufacturing.

Tom Medina, Engineering Fellow, Medical
Tom Medina, Engineering Fellow, Medical
The challenge is keeping in mind all the factors driving innovation in medical devices...We look at these factors when thinking about the clinical value we can help customers achieve.

Tom focuses on the big picture while minding the details that matter. Inspired by the people he works alongside, he is energized by hard effort, creativity, esprit de corps, and commitment to achieving business advantages. He leads by guiding his team in confronting tough problems that require a concerted, balanced approach to sorting and ordering chaos into actionable plans built around priorities and into bite-sized tasks that address opportunities. To keep projects on target, he partners with customers and his engineers to understand the needs of all stakeholders and advocates the use of tools that help the team manage and evaluate these needs. This approach enables the team to address the requirements most critical to achieving expected quality and customer satisfaction. A first-generation Trekkie who's watched every Apollo mission, Tom became an engineer so he could play a role in creating a safer, smarter future. At TE, he is enabling customers to develop medical devices for life-saving therapies that are improving patient health and transforming the healthcare industry.

1

Which connectivity challenges are you working to solve?

I'm working on solutions for next-generation medical devices. These will increasingly feature more functionality and deliver spectrum of advantages: Offering higher resolution, addressing smaller anatomical structures, enabling easier use, improving patient safety, and reducing procedure cost. I lead a small team of engineers solving for these advantages in powered surgical instruments, endoscopes, active catheters, and wearable defibrillator devices.

 

I am focused on interventional cardiac imaging and mapping devices. The scope of work includes the integration of micro-electronic components, sensors, cabling, circuits and connectors into devices; all of which are driving miniaturization, limited use (disposable), and larger scale production.

2

What are some concerns to address when designing medical devices?

A key consideration is the cost of healthcare. Minimally invasive procedures generate small incisions which are less stressful to the body and allow for shorter hospital stays. This has created opportunities for developing new medical devices that can similarly address a broad spectrum of diagnostics and therapies. These devices can capture images, take biometric data, remove or ablate tissue, repair organs, deploy implants, and in most cases, enable physicians to perform combinations of these procedures.

 

Many medical devices require integrated components for tracking and navigation. To function as expected, these must be developed for compatibility with human anatomy – microscale features – and to qualify for healthcare reimbursements, enable low-cost and highly successful outcomes. The challenge is keeping in mind all the factors driving innovation in medical devices. This means keep top-of-mind the challenges, such as how clinical procedures are evolving, how device requirements are changing, and which new materials, fabrication methods, and sensors offer the potential to enable new disruptive therapies. We look at these factors when thinking about the clinical value we can help customers achieve.

3

Which technology trends are you watching?

There is a growing interest in displacing piezoelectric imaging transducers with MEMS-based sensors offering integrated functionality. These sensors can lower cost and improve performance. One current initiative is enabling us to develop new approaches for connecting a composite cable structure. There is a lot to learn about this type of interconnection. We are open to exploring alternative approaches with an aim toward optimizing consistency, durability, and manufacturability.

 

We are also investigating the use of 3D-printed circuits as an alternative to conventional solder, MID, and flex-circuit based solutions. There are clear advantages in using this technology when assembling micro-scale components, particularly because additive manufacturing enables new design options, lower cost, and large-scale manufacturing.