Product Sustaining Engineer Mark Brubaker
Product Sustaining Engineer Mark Brubaker
With the potential of graphene technology, speed capabilities would increase dramatically and the electronics world will take a quantum leap.

Mark Brubaker was the kind of child who was always asking why. Why does this drawer open and close? Why does my RC car move? This curiosity became passion and led him to pursue a degree at Penn State Harrisburg in Mechanical Engineering. In 2013, TE presented an endowment to Penn State Harrisburg, Mark was proud to be chosen to speak on behalf of Penn State Alumni to the local TE and Penn State community, along with Tom Lynch, Chairman and CEO, TE Connectivity. And today, Mark is still asking, "why?" and that is what is driving him forward in his career and furthering his expertise. 

1

What latest innovation do you see having the biggest impact over the next 10 years?

I believe one of the biggest impacts we will see on the world in the next 10 years is the future application and use of graphene within the electronics world. With speed capabilities 100x faster than the currently used Silicon technologies, the electronics world will take a quantum leap. This will increase efficiencies, change existing mindsets, and bring about a radical surge in technological advancement. Since most of our lives have already been integrated with electronics, the infrastructure is already in place for this advancement to reach every aspect of our lives. 

2

What is the single biggest achievement of your career?

In 2013, TE presented an endowment to Penn State Harrisburg. I had the opportunity and honor to speak on behalf of the Penn State Alumni to the local TE and Penn State community. Among this group was our CEO Tom Lynch, Jane Leipold, Dave Rupnik, and a local news network. It was a great experience to be able to thank TE for their generous gift, while at the same time being able to speak on behalf of TE as an employee and show the value of a relationship with Penn State. It was also a great honor to meet and talk with some of our TE leadership team. 

3

What engineer do you idolize, and what are they best known for?

My biggest engineering role model is Nikola Tesla. One of the most influential contributions to society is his design of the AC electricity supply system. Despite the intense media abuse from Thomas Edison and his desire to use DC as the main power transmitting electricity, Tesla’s design held true and we now utilize AC to transmit power. This is a good illustration for us when we face opposition in the pursuit of our dreams. 

4

When did you first realize that you wanted to work in engineering, and why?

As a young child I was always attempting to determine why? Why does this drawer open and close? Why does my RC car move? Why does my refrigerator keep my milk cold? All of this curiosity led me to take things apart and put them back together – or leave them apart. This curiosity was also a passion, and it led me to high level scientific subjects as well as psychological subjects. At the end of the day I chose engineering, and I decided to pursue a degree at Penn State Harrisburg in Mechanical Engineering. 

5

What would you do if you weren't an engineer?

Engineering is not only math and science, it is also creativity and art. This means that a good engineer has more knowledge than just technical knowledge. A good engineer is also creative and artistic. This is why famous renaissance men not only pursued technological advancement, but also had a strong artistic ability. A prime example is Leonardo da Vinci. I see this same blend of creativity and technicality within the world of computer science. I thoroughly enjoyed many of my computer science classes in University and would pursue this vocation if I had not gone into engineering. 

Engineering is not only math and science, it is also creativity and art.
Mark Brubaker,
TE product engineer
Product Sustaining Engineer Mark Brubaker
Product Sustaining Engineer Mark Brubaker
With the potential of graphene technology, speed capabilities would increase dramatically and the electronics world will take a quantum leap.

Mark Brubaker was the kind of child who was always asking why. Why does this drawer open and close? Why does my RC car move? This curiosity became passion and led him to pursue a degree at Penn State Harrisburg in Mechanical Engineering. In 2013, TE presented an endowment to Penn State Harrisburg, Mark was proud to be chosen to speak on behalf of Penn State Alumni to the local TE and Penn State community, along with Tom Lynch, Chairman and CEO, TE Connectivity. And today, Mark is still asking, "why?" and that is what is driving him forward in his career and furthering his expertise. 

1

What latest innovation do you see having the biggest impact over the next 10 years?

I believe one of the biggest impacts we will see on the world in the next 10 years is the future application and use of graphene within the electronics world. With speed capabilities 100x faster than the currently used Silicon technologies, the electronics world will take a quantum leap. This will increase efficiencies, change existing mindsets, and bring about a radical surge in technological advancement. Since most of our lives have already been integrated with electronics, the infrastructure is already in place for this advancement to reach every aspect of our lives. 

2

What is the single biggest achievement of your career?

In 2013, TE presented an endowment to Penn State Harrisburg. I had the opportunity and honor to speak on behalf of the Penn State Alumni to the local TE and Penn State community. Among this group was our CEO Tom Lynch, Jane Leipold, Dave Rupnik, and a local news network. It was a great experience to be able to thank TE for their generous gift, while at the same time being able to speak on behalf of TE as an employee and show the value of a relationship with Penn State. It was also a great honor to meet and talk with some of our TE leadership team. 

3

What engineer do you idolize, and what are they best known for?

My biggest engineering role model is Nikola Tesla. One of the most influential contributions to society is his design of the AC electricity supply system. Despite the intense media abuse from Thomas Edison and his desire to use DC as the main power transmitting electricity, Tesla’s design held true and we now utilize AC to transmit power. This is a good illustration for us when we face opposition in the pursuit of our dreams. 

4

When did you first realize that you wanted to work in engineering, and why?

As a young child I was always attempting to determine why? Why does this drawer open and close? Why does my RC car move? Why does my refrigerator keep my milk cold? All of this curiosity led me to take things apart and put them back together – or leave them apart. This curiosity was also a passion, and it led me to high level scientific subjects as well as psychological subjects. At the end of the day I chose engineering, and I decided to pursue a degree at Penn State Harrisburg in Mechanical Engineering. 

5

What would you do if you weren't an engineer?

Engineering is not only math and science, it is also creativity and art. This means that a good engineer has more knowledge than just technical knowledge. A good engineer is also creative and artistic. This is why famous renaissance men not only pursued technological advancement, but also had a strong artistic ability. A prime example is Leonardo da Vinci. I see this same blend of creativity and technicality within the world of computer science. I thoroughly enjoyed many of my computer science classes in University and would pursue this vocation if I had not gone into engineering. 

Engineering is not only math and science, it is also creativity and art.
Mark Brubaker,
TE product engineer