John Myer, Engineering Fellow, Automotive
John Myer, Engineering Fellow, Automotive
We are helping customers solve for fast charging of electric vehicles...[to] provide them with differentiating value.

John enjoys finding simple solutions to complex problems. Over his career, John has learned to identify which few things are critically important to solve and then to focus on solving for those things first. Growing up on a small farm under the guidance of parents who were foundational role models, John learned early that curiosity is crucial to learning how things work and working out how to fix things properly. His sense of curiosity for math and science led him to engineering. And through engineering, he learned that there are always many possible solutions – but there is only one best solution for every problem. For John, solving problems effectively means understanding how to combine common sense, digital tools and computer modeling and analysis to think critically, it also means taking a hands-on approach to look for the real problem. In his work, he relies on Six Sigma, Design of Experiments, and the laws of physics to determine the fundamental equations while keeping an eye on the direction these are heading toward. He applies these tools and methods to help customers in the automotive industry think outside the box to find that one best solution for their requirements.

1

Which connectivity challenges are you working to solve?

Robust miniaturization is a high priority in the automotive industry. Increased electronic content is continuously driving the need for miniaturization without compromising function or robustness. It is not enough to be small if it gets broken during the vehicle assembly process or doesn’t fulfill the intended function. We are solving this with our new 0.50mm size terminal and connector systems, which we are introducing into the North American marketplace. Our systems are designed to be low cost and less than half the size of the 0.64mm systems previously used for signal level applications. Additionally, we are helping customers solve for fast charging of electric vehicles, which is increasingly an important and challenging connectivity problem that could provide them with differentiating value.

 

2

What are the challenges in enabling fast charging of electric vehicles?

Fast charging systems must be capable of carrying high currents while also performing reliably even when subjected to a high number of mating cycles. This requires new high-durability platings and robust terminal designs, which offer multiple contact points to optimize the mechanical, electrical and thermal performance of the system in the available packaging space.

 

With this, the increase in electronic content throughout today's vehicles is generating a need for more connectivity, which means that packaging space becomes a more critical than ever design consideration. Surface mount connectors are increasingly popular in automotive, because these products only utilize one side of the printed circuit board. The side opposite the connector is then available for adding other components; this means that we can now develop modules which are smaller than ever before. When you consider the needs for autonomous vehicle technology, you can see that the packaging will play a role in enabling higher data rates and vehicle electrification, which will generate a need for higher power throughout the vehicle.

 

It's crucial to keep front-of-mind that reducing cost, size, and weight are business-critical forces shaping the automotive market. This means using silver plating to replace gold plating and replacing traditional through hole soldering of headers to printed circuit boards with surface mount soldering or compliant pins. Today, we are also developing miniaturized systems to reduce space and weight. This is being implemented to meet expected need for reliably transferring data at high speeds, which will become increasingly important in an autonomous and connected world.

3

How is TE enabling customers to achieve efficiencies?

Meeting fuel efficiency standards means looking for ways to reduce weight. We are developing new miniaturized terminal and connector systems which save weight and space by using smaller wires. For example, our LITEALUM crimps allow customers to use aluminum wire instead of copper, and when combined with using foamed plastics, this simple solution can help to reduce weight throughout the vehicle.

 

John Myer, Engineering Fellow, Automotive
John Myer, Engineering Fellow, Automotive
We are helping customers solve for fast charging of electric vehicles...[to] provide them with differentiating value.

John enjoys finding simple solutions to complex problems. Over his career, John has learned to identify which few things are critically important to solve and then to focus on solving for those things first. Growing up on a small farm under the guidance of parents who were foundational role models, John learned early that curiosity is crucial to learning how things work and working out how to fix things properly. His sense of curiosity for math and science led him to engineering. And through engineering, he learned that there are always many possible solutions – but there is only one best solution for every problem. For John, solving problems effectively means understanding how to combine common sense, digital tools and computer modeling and analysis to think critically, it also means taking a hands-on approach to look for the real problem. In his work, he relies on Six Sigma, Design of Experiments, and the laws of physics to determine the fundamental equations while keeping an eye on the direction these are heading toward. He applies these tools and methods to help customers in the automotive industry think outside the box to find that one best solution for their requirements.

1

Which connectivity challenges are you working to solve?

Robust miniaturization is a high priority in the automotive industry. Increased electronic content is continuously driving the need for miniaturization without compromising function or robustness. It is not enough to be small if it gets broken during the vehicle assembly process or doesn’t fulfill the intended function. We are solving this with our new 0.50mm size terminal and connector systems, which we are introducing into the North American marketplace. Our systems are designed to be low cost and less than half the size of the 0.64mm systems previously used for signal level applications. Additionally, we are helping customers solve for fast charging of electric vehicles, which is increasingly an important and challenging connectivity problem that could provide them with differentiating value.

 

2

What are the challenges in enabling fast charging of electric vehicles?

Fast charging systems must be capable of carrying high currents while also performing reliably even when subjected to a high number of mating cycles. This requires new high-durability platings and robust terminal designs, which offer multiple contact points to optimize the mechanical, electrical and thermal performance of the system in the available packaging space.

 

With this, the increase in electronic content throughout today's vehicles is generating a need for more connectivity, which means that packaging space becomes a more critical than ever design consideration. Surface mount connectors are increasingly popular in automotive, because these products only utilize one side of the printed circuit board. The side opposite the connector is then available for adding other components; this means that we can now develop modules which are smaller than ever before. When you consider the needs for autonomous vehicle technology, you can see that the packaging will play a role in enabling higher data rates and vehicle electrification, which will generate a need for higher power throughout the vehicle.

 

It's crucial to keep front-of-mind that reducing cost, size, and weight are business-critical forces shaping the automotive market. This means using silver plating to replace gold plating and replacing traditional through hole soldering of headers to printed circuit boards with surface mount soldering or compliant pins. Today, we are also developing miniaturized systems to reduce space and weight. This is being implemented to meet expected need for reliably transferring data at high speeds, which will become increasingly important in an autonomous and connected world.

3

How is TE enabling customers to achieve efficiencies?

Meeting fuel efficiency standards means looking for ways to reduce weight. We are developing new miniaturized terminal and connector systems which save weight and space by using smaller wires. For example, our LITEALUM crimps allow customers to use aluminum wire instead of copper, and when combined with using foamed plastics, this simple solution can help to reduce weight throughout the vehicle.