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Byron Hill, Chief Technology Officer, Sensors
Byron Hill, Chief Technology Officer, Sensors
With sensors, the opportunity is solving for new applications and market demand for sensors that are smaller, use less power, and offer more functionality.

Byron is inspired by challenges that can lead to a benefit or positive outcome. In his work leading the technology vision for the TE sensors team, he knows that the journey to solving the challenge is as important as the outcome. When it comes to solving the tough problems, Byron first seeks to understand not only the problem but also the benefit that the customer could gain from achieving a solution. His love for math, science, problem solving, and learning gives him a solid foundation for understanding what to do first and how to identify the right problem to solve. By working closely with customers and his teams, using scientific principles to tackle real-world problems, and translating theoretical designs into practical solutions, Byron enables customers and his teams to stay on track in defining and designing for the most feasible, effective outcome achievable. As a member of TE's Executive Committee and Chair of the Engineering Council was responsible for providing technology thought leadership to the CEO, executive team, and business unit CTOs, Byron applies his broad experience leading the strategic direction of global engineering organizations to drive innovation through internal initiatives, partnerships, and mergers and acquisitions.

1

What is driving innovation in sensing technologies?

Too often people think innovation is about discovery. In our work, innovation is less about discovering a new element on the periodic table, and more focused on solving problems by using existing technology and applying established scientific principles. We look to unlock potential by exposing our engineering teams to the problems are customers are trying to solve, regardless if the problem is related to sensing or not.

 

Today, there are many sensing technologies, and many of these are focused on detecting physical properties, such as pressure, temperature, and position/orientation. To stay on top of sensors trends, we work closely with recognized Innovators in various markets as well as industry research institutes and universities.

 

2

What is driving demand for sensors in technology?

Customer expectations are driving market forces. It is obvious but crucial to remember: Customers want the sensors to work as expected, with the same accuracy and performance every time, over long periods, under challenging conditions. A lot of people can make a sensor work in a lab. It takes innovation to produce a sensor that performs under harsh use, such as in the products we all rely on every day.

 

When it comes to sensors design, connectivity is not the center of what we are solving for, because the connectivity is expected. With sensors, the opportunity is solving to meet the constants – in other words, the constraints involved in making sensors that are smaller, use less power, and offer more functionality. This is being driven by the mega-trends – such as mobility and miniaturization. These trends are influencing our customers and their markets.


For our customers, they are focused on delivering value to their customers. That means we need to design sensor solutions that help make environments safer and applications more productive. In some cases, it is also about improving the experience, by relying on the sensors to help the end-customer understand what is going on, so they can take an action. By enabling this in our solutions, we want customers to think about how TE can partner with them, delivering the expertise to solve complex sensing functionality and help our customer provide their customers with performance they expect.

 

An example of this is an occlusion application, which looks for blockages in the bloodstream. Physicians rely on this technology to detect the presence of air (shown as bubbles). The sensor can see if there is too much air in the bloodstream, based on the number and the size of the bubbles flowing by the sensor.

Byron Hill, Chief Technology Officer, Sensors
Byron Hill, Chief Technology Officer, Sensors
With sensors, the opportunity is solving for new applications and market demand for sensors that are smaller, use less power, and offer more functionality.

Byron is inspired by challenges that can lead to a benefit or positive outcome. In his work leading the technology vision for the TE sensors team, he knows that the journey to solving the challenge is as important as the outcome. When it comes to solving the tough problems, Byron first seeks to understand not only the problem but also the benefit that the customer could gain from achieving a solution. His love for math, science, problem solving, and learning gives him a solid foundation for understanding what to do first and how to identify the right problem to solve. By working closely with customers and his teams, using scientific principles to tackle real-world problems, and translating theoretical designs into practical solutions, Byron enables customers and his teams to stay on track in defining and designing for the most feasible, effective outcome achievable. As a member of TE's Executive Committee and Chair of the Engineering Council was responsible for providing technology thought leadership to the CEO, executive team, and business unit CTOs, Byron applies his broad experience leading the strategic direction of global engineering organizations to drive innovation through internal initiatives, partnerships, and mergers and acquisitions.

1

What is driving innovation in sensing technologies?

Too often people think innovation is about discovery. In our work, innovation is less about discovering a new element on the periodic table, and more focused on solving problems by using existing technology and applying established scientific principles. We look to unlock potential by exposing our engineering teams to the problems are customers are trying to solve, regardless if the problem is related to sensing or not.

 

Today, there are many sensing technologies, and many of these are focused on detecting physical properties, such as pressure, temperature, and position/orientation. To stay on top of sensors trends, we work closely with recognized Innovators in various markets as well as industry research institutes and universities.

 

2

What is driving demand for sensors in technology?

Customer expectations are driving market forces. It is obvious but crucial to remember: Customers want the sensors to work as expected, with the same accuracy and performance every time, over long periods, under challenging conditions. A lot of people can make a sensor work in a lab. It takes innovation to produce a sensor that performs under harsh use, such as in the products we all rely on every day.

 

When it comes to sensors design, connectivity is not the center of what we are solving for, because the connectivity is expected. With sensors, the opportunity is solving to meet the constants – in other words, the constraints involved in making sensors that are smaller, use less power, and offer more functionality. This is being driven by the mega-trends – such as mobility and miniaturization. These trends are influencing our customers and their markets.


For our customers, they are focused on delivering value to their customers. That means we need to design sensor solutions that help make environments safer and applications more productive. In some cases, it is also about improving the experience, by relying on the sensors to help the end-customer understand what is going on, so they can take an action. By enabling this in our solutions, we want customers to think about how TE can partner with them, delivering the expertise to solve complex sensing functionality and help our customer provide their customers with performance they expect.

 

An example of this is an occlusion application, which looks for blockages in the bloodstream. Physicians rely on this technology to detect the presence of air (shown as bubbles). The sensor can see if there is too much air in the bloodstream, based on the number and the size of the bubbles flowing by the sensor.