jessica-hemond
jessica-hemond
Mentoring is about helping the person find the right answer, not giving them the right answer.

After studying Materials Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Jessica joined AMP Incorporated as a Technology rotational, with a concentration in metals.  When Jessica’s rotation ended she joined the Corporate Test Lab based in Harrisburg where her responsibilities included materials selection, competitive analysis and failure analysis. Under TE, Jessica later joined the Polymer Purchasing group in a technical support role working of the introduction of new materials and suppliers to TE as well as supporting both product development and manufacturing for polymer related issues. While in that role, Jessica led the polymer portion of the GMSS development and supported TE’s product compliance efforts to the RoHS and ELV legislation. Jessica rejoined the Corporate Materials Technology group where she is currently based. In that role, she has worked with the termination of CNT wires as well as characterization of new plating technologies and plating bath development. Currently, her responsibilities are focused in additive manufacturing with an emphasis on materials for polymer mold tooling and directly printing TE production materials.

What inspired you to pursue a career in engineering?

I was always interested in not only how things worked, but how that understanding could be applied to solve everyday problems. In high school, I was able to participate in a career exploration day at Calspan (an engineering, research and testing services company). This experience reinforced my interest and allowed me to see what an engineering career could look like.

  1. Unleashing Potential

At TE, we focus on enabling women to reach their full potential through inspiration, networking, mentoring, and professional development.

Describe how you benefited from a mentor’s guidance and how this influences your work today.

Often the recommendation is to find a mentor that is a couple of levels above you. While I wouldn’t necessarily disagree with that advice, I would amend it to broaden its reach. You should never find just one mentor, but look to find a network of people that you can learn from, openly discuss and get honest feedback. You will find them at different levels, different organizations and in different countries. The interaction and understanding you will gain is invaluable and will allow for growth, both technically as well personally.


I have been very lucky in my career to find key mentors at times, even if I didn’t realize that they key times to my career development. By having this broad network, I gained different perspectives and different ideas for how to approach any problem. I would add that some of the best advice is not that which is given, but which is modeled. I still recall one key discussion that even years later, I still value and often share. I was interviewing for a new position, when in who was to become my future boss, asked me about my thoughts on travel. While I certainly had no issues with travel, the person asking the question literally spent more days traveling than in the office. With his question, we had an open discussion on effectively the evolution of a person in balancing responsibilities and desires. What is obvious to one person, may not be to another. This discussion not only helped me understand the expectations of the job I would ultimately take, but taught a life lesson. Expectations matter. What is clear and obvious to you, does not mean that it is to everyone else or that it is the only answer. Asking this question allowed for an effective way to step back and bring issues forefront. It also provided a demonstration on the need to view others not only through the prism of your own personal experiences, but to be open to their background, where they are now and what external influences might be at play. What I have always found interesting is this is not only great advice from a personal interaction but also technically. Taking the time to stop, gather information and think about what the next steps could be is critical to making sure you don’t overlook an easy solution or others’ input.


As I work with engineers new to TE or to interns, this is key understanding. Everyone has potential and helping to provide a sounding board, without rejecting ideas or actions, is critical to growth. The ability to explore and work on a problem is what makes engineering fun. I often recall this advice and stop myself. Ask a question why and what do you think will happen. Mentoring is about helping the person find the right answer, not giving them the answer.

Why TE?

When I joined TE, I was attracted to the variety of opportunities I would have. As part of the rotational program, TE allowed me the chance to work on real issues and gain experience working in different environments, from the plant floor to research laboratories. The breadth of opportunities TE offers continues beyond that initial experience, and I have found the willingness of my TE co-workers to look beyond organizational and other barriers to solve problems energizing and rewarding.

"TE allowed me the chance to work on real issues and gain experience working in different environments, from the plant floor to research laboratories."
jessica-hemond
jessica-hemond
Mentoring is about helping the person find the right answer, not giving them the right answer.

After studying Materials Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Jessica joined AMP Incorporated as a Technology rotational, with a concentration in metals.  When Jessica’s rotation ended she joined the Corporate Test Lab based in Harrisburg where her responsibilities included materials selection, competitive analysis and failure analysis. Under TE, Jessica later joined the Polymer Purchasing group in a technical support role working of the introduction of new materials and suppliers to TE as well as supporting both product development and manufacturing for polymer related issues. While in that role, Jessica led the polymer portion of the GMSS development and supported TE’s product compliance efforts to the RoHS and ELV legislation. Jessica rejoined the Corporate Materials Technology group where she is currently based. In that role, she has worked with the termination of CNT wires as well as characterization of new plating technologies and plating bath development. Currently, her responsibilities are focused in additive manufacturing with an emphasis on materials for polymer mold tooling and directly printing TE production materials.

What inspired you to pursue a career in engineering?

I was always interested in not only how things worked, but how that understanding could be applied to solve everyday problems. In high school, I was able to participate in a career exploration day at Calspan (an engineering, research and testing services company). This experience reinforced my interest and allowed me to see what an engineering career could look like.

  1. Unleashing Potential

At TE, we focus on enabling women to reach their full potential through inspiration, networking, mentoring, and professional development.

Describe how you benefited from a mentor’s guidance and how this influences your work today.

Often the recommendation is to find a mentor that is a couple of levels above you. While I wouldn’t necessarily disagree with that advice, I would amend it to broaden its reach. You should never find just one mentor, but look to find a network of people that you can learn from, openly discuss and get honest feedback. You will find them at different levels, different organizations and in different countries. The interaction and understanding you will gain is invaluable and will allow for growth, both technically as well personally.


I have been very lucky in my career to find key mentors at times, even if I didn’t realize that they key times to my career development. By having this broad network, I gained different perspectives and different ideas for how to approach any problem. I would add that some of the best advice is not that which is given, but which is modeled. I still recall one key discussion that even years later, I still value and often share. I was interviewing for a new position, when in who was to become my future boss, asked me about my thoughts on travel. While I certainly had no issues with travel, the person asking the question literally spent more days traveling than in the office. With his question, we had an open discussion on effectively the evolution of a person in balancing responsibilities and desires. What is obvious to one person, may not be to another. This discussion not only helped me understand the expectations of the job I would ultimately take, but taught a life lesson. Expectations matter. What is clear and obvious to you, does not mean that it is to everyone else or that it is the only answer. Asking this question allowed for an effective way to step back and bring issues forefront. It also provided a demonstration on the need to view others not only through the prism of your own personal experiences, but to be open to their background, where they are now and what external influences might be at play. What I have always found interesting is this is not only great advice from a personal interaction but also technically. Taking the time to stop, gather information and think about what the next steps could be is critical to making sure you don’t overlook an easy solution or others’ input.


As I work with engineers new to TE or to interns, this is key understanding. Everyone has potential and helping to provide a sounding board, without rejecting ideas or actions, is critical to growth. The ability to explore and work on a problem is what makes engineering fun. I often recall this advice and stop myself. Ask a question why and what do you think will happen. Mentoring is about helping the person find the right answer, not giving them the answer.

Why TE?

When I joined TE, I was attracted to the variety of opportunities I would have. As part of the rotational program, TE allowed me the chance to work on real issues and gain experience working in different environments, from the plant floor to research laboratories. The breadth of opportunities TE offers continues beyond that initial experience, and I have found the willingness of my TE co-workers to look beyond organizational and other barriers to solve problems energizing and rewarding.

"TE allowed me the chance to work on real issues and gain experience working in different environments, from the plant floor to research laboratories."