Cindy Cruz
Cindy Cruz
The founding values of Integrity, Accountability, Teamwork, Innovation at TE Connectivity closely aligns with those I believe in and why I’m proud to be part of our Veterans ERG.

Cindy Cruz is the Staffing Operations Manager for Global Talent Acquisition. In her role, she is responsible for Staffing Operations strategy and execution along with partnering with the HR Operations & Effectiveness team to drive Continuous Improvement initiatives.  Cindy is also responsible for driving TE’s Veterans Recruitment Program for North America while partnering with the Veterans ERG, Global Inclusion & Diversity, University Relations, and the business.  Prior to joining TE Connectivity, Cindy worked for Enterprise Holdings, Inc. (parent company for Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Alamo, and National Car Rental) holding multiple roles including Corporate Recruitment, Human Resources, and Quality Assurance.  Prior to 2003, Cindy served 4 years on active duty with the U.S. Army as a Sergeant in Warehouse Logistics to include touring 1 year in Sinai, Egypt.  Cindy earned her Masters degree in HR Management from Webster University and her Bachelors degree in Psychology with a minor in Sociology from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, IL.  Cindy is also a certified HR professional by the Society of Human Resources (SHRM) and Human Resources Certificate Institute (HRCI). 

1

Describe a shift early in your career and how your veteran experience influenced your goals and expectations.

I come from a family of veterans but the first in my family to join as a woman. My father met my mother while serving in the Army. My step-father made a lifetime career serving in the Army to include touring Saudi Arabia during Desert Storm and twice in Afghanistan during Operation Iraqi Freedom. I have two cousins that are former Marines and another who served in the Navy, one of which later became a Federal Air Marshal and another who is now a Police Officer. I have an uncle who served in the Navy and another who served in the Airforce and later retired in the Army.  Despite the various family members who served, joining the military was never of any interest to me while growing up. I’d always find a way to dart down another hallway or jump into the girls restroom just to avoid the recruiters in high school. 

As a senior in high school, I was determined to see the world and be the first in my family to go to college but I had a couple of barriers to face: (1) The only local 4 year University in Anchorage, Alaska lost its accreditation at the time and had no 4 year programs of any interest to me (2) I was ineligible for Federal Educational Assistance due to my parent’s income (3) None of the scholarship programs I sought would cover my 1st year of education in the other schools I considered.  One day, I was forced to listen to an Army recruiter give his pitch at a career advancement course I was enrolled in. It was at this time that I learned of the Montgomery G.I. Bill (Army College Fund) and became intrigued. After several in-depth conversations with family members, friends, and the recruiter I decided to take a leap and join the service. 

My family and friends didn’t believe me when I told them of my decision. Some even told me I would never make it, which of course only made me more determined to prove them all wrong. As a high school varsity cheerleader and dancer, I wasn’t the sort of person you’d think of when you envisioned a soldier.  Yet, the value of hard work and living the American Dream was written in my DNA.  I came from a family of immigrants who had to work two jobs at times to make ends meet.  My mother emigrated from Mexico at the age of 18 and couldn’t speak any English. She won the lottery for her work visa after several years of trying to obtain, including asking my grandmother to get in line at 4 am every morning just to get an appointment with immigration while she was at work. On her final appointment with immigration (before her visa approval) her manager gave her an ultimatum in that she would lose her job is she chose to go. I often think back on how life would be different had my mother chose not to go to this final appointment for her visa. Both my parents made it a point to ensure that I always remembered where I came from and to appreciate the freedom I have to live in this country. 

Without a doubt there were several times I considered giving up due to the psychological and physiological pain my body and mind endured while in the military. Just when I thought of giving up, I would learn about the hardships of my fellow soldiers and suddenly mine became unparalleled to theirs. I remember one fellow soldier, while in basic training, who was forced out of the Army due to a medical injury and had no job or home to return to. She had grown up in foster homes and joined the military just after turning 18 as her only chance to get ahead.  Another turning point for me was on my way back to basic training after being hospitalized with a virus and severe dehydration.  While waiting at a bus stop with other sick/injured soldiers waiting to return back to training, I came across some graffiti on the wall that read “Per aspera ad astra”, a Latin phrase which means “A rough road leads to the stars”. It was the first time I had ever heard this phrase and it really resonated while reminding me of my childhood upbringing. There were many other experiences in the military that I believe still contribute to my success today. I had the opportunity to build relationships across the world while completing my overseas assignment in Sinai, Egypt with the Multination Force and Observers peacekeeping organization just months after 9/11. Through all of the time that I served, the Army Core Values (Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity, and Personal Courage) became another new part of my DNA. 

People always ask me what it was like being in the military, and my response is always the same.  It was an experience I would never take back and very crucial in molding me into the person I am today.  The Army taught me how to become a “survivor” at life in general along with providing me with the opportunity to complete my undergraduate studies. However, it was my determination taught to me by my parents that drove me to complete my graduate studies and my professional certification.

2

Why TE? Why do you enjoy working at TE?

Company culture is always an important factor in my career moves after serving in the military. The founding values of Integrity, Accountability, Teamwork, and Innovation at TE Connectivity closely aligns with those I believe in and why I chose TE as my next career move. To this day I don’t regret joining this company one bit. TE is a fantastic organization full of opportunities to partner with fellow co-workers across the globe.

People always ask me what it was like being in the military, and my response is always the same. It was an experience I would never take back and very crucial in molding me into the person I am today.
Cindy Cruz,
Staffing Operations Manager, Global Talent Acquisition
Cindy Cruz
Cindy Cruz
The founding values of Integrity, Accountability, Teamwork, Innovation at TE Connectivity closely aligns with those I believe in and why I’m proud to be part of our Veterans ERG.

Cindy Cruz is the Staffing Operations Manager for Global Talent Acquisition. In her role, she is responsible for Staffing Operations strategy and execution along with partnering with the HR Operations & Effectiveness team to drive Continuous Improvement initiatives.  Cindy is also responsible for driving TE’s Veterans Recruitment Program for North America while partnering with the Veterans ERG, Global Inclusion & Diversity, University Relations, and the business.  Prior to joining TE Connectivity, Cindy worked for Enterprise Holdings, Inc. (parent company for Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Alamo, and National Car Rental) holding multiple roles including Corporate Recruitment, Human Resources, and Quality Assurance.  Prior to 2003, Cindy served 4 years on active duty with the U.S. Army as a Sergeant in Warehouse Logistics to include touring 1 year in Sinai, Egypt.  Cindy earned her Masters degree in HR Management from Webster University and her Bachelors degree in Psychology with a minor in Sociology from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, IL.  Cindy is also a certified HR professional by the Society of Human Resources (SHRM) and Human Resources Certificate Institute (HRCI). 

1

Describe a shift early in your career and how your veteran experience influenced your goals and expectations.

I come from a family of veterans but the first in my family to join as a woman. My father met my mother while serving in the Army. My step-father made a lifetime career serving in the Army to include touring Saudi Arabia during Desert Storm and twice in Afghanistan during Operation Iraqi Freedom. I have two cousins that are former Marines and another who served in the Navy, one of which later became a Federal Air Marshal and another who is now a Police Officer. I have an uncle who served in the Navy and another who served in the Airforce and later retired in the Army.  Despite the various family members who served, joining the military was never of any interest to me while growing up. I’d always find a way to dart down another hallway or jump into the girls restroom just to avoid the recruiters in high school. 

As a senior in high school, I was determined to see the world and be the first in my family to go to college but I had a couple of barriers to face: (1) The only local 4 year University in Anchorage, Alaska lost its accreditation at the time and had no 4 year programs of any interest to me (2) I was ineligible for Federal Educational Assistance due to my parent’s income (3) None of the scholarship programs I sought would cover my 1st year of education in the other schools I considered.  One day, I was forced to listen to an Army recruiter give his pitch at a career advancement course I was enrolled in. It was at this time that I learned of the Montgomery G.I. Bill (Army College Fund) and became intrigued. After several in-depth conversations with family members, friends, and the recruiter I decided to take a leap and join the service. 

My family and friends didn’t believe me when I told them of my decision. Some even told me I would never make it, which of course only made me more determined to prove them all wrong. As a high school varsity cheerleader and dancer, I wasn’t the sort of person you’d think of when you envisioned a soldier.  Yet, the value of hard work and living the American Dream was written in my DNA.  I came from a family of immigrants who had to work two jobs at times to make ends meet.  My mother emigrated from Mexico at the age of 18 and couldn’t speak any English. She won the lottery for her work visa after several years of trying to obtain, including asking my grandmother to get in line at 4 am every morning just to get an appointment with immigration while she was at work. On her final appointment with immigration (before her visa approval) her manager gave her an ultimatum in that she would lose her job is she chose to go. I often think back on how life would be different had my mother chose not to go to this final appointment for her visa. Both my parents made it a point to ensure that I always remembered where I came from and to appreciate the freedom I have to live in this country. 

Without a doubt there were several times I considered giving up due to the psychological and physiological pain my body and mind endured while in the military. Just when I thought of giving up, I would learn about the hardships of my fellow soldiers and suddenly mine became unparalleled to theirs. I remember one fellow soldier, while in basic training, who was forced out of the Army due to a medical injury and had no job or home to return to. She had grown up in foster homes and joined the military just after turning 18 as her only chance to get ahead.  Another turning point for me was on my way back to basic training after being hospitalized with a virus and severe dehydration.  While waiting at a bus stop with other sick/injured soldiers waiting to return back to training, I came across some graffiti on the wall that read “Per aspera ad astra”, a Latin phrase which means “A rough road leads to the stars”. It was the first time I had ever heard this phrase and it really resonated while reminding me of my childhood upbringing. There were many other experiences in the military that I believe still contribute to my success today. I had the opportunity to build relationships across the world while completing my overseas assignment in Sinai, Egypt with the Multination Force and Observers peacekeeping organization just months after 9/11. Through all of the time that I served, the Army Core Values (Loyalty, Duty, Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity, and Personal Courage) became another new part of my DNA. 

People always ask me what it was like being in the military, and my response is always the same.  It was an experience I would never take back and very crucial in molding me into the person I am today.  The Army taught me how to become a “survivor” at life in general along with providing me with the opportunity to complete my undergraduate studies. However, it was my determination taught to me by my parents that drove me to complete my graduate studies and my professional certification.

2

Why TE? Why do you enjoy working at TE?

Company culture is always an important factor in my career moves after serving in the military. The founding values of Integrity, Accountability, Teamwork, and Innovation at TE Connectivity closely aligns with those I believe in and why I chose TE as my next career move. To this day I don’t regret joining this company one bit. TE is a fantastic organization full of opportunities to partner with fellow co-workers across the globe.

People always ask me what it was like being in the military, and my response is always the same. It was an experience I would never take back and very crucial in molding me into the person I am today.
Cindy Cruz,
Staffing Operations Manager, Global Talent Acquisition