Ryan Prunty
Ryan Prunty
Every day is a new challenge. It might seem so insignificant, but it will come up again in your career, so leverage it and keep it in your toolbox of skills.

As a Manager of Manufacturing Engineering, Ryan Prunty is responsible for the Design, Molding, Engineering and Inspection departments of TE’s Strategic Tooling Center in Winston-Salem, NC.  He graduated from Penn State University, The Behrend College with a B.S. in Plastics Engineering.  He started with TE in 2011 as a Manufacturing Engineer in the Rotation Program where he later began his full-time role as a Mold Engineer with the Strategic Tooling Center in North Carolina.  Ryan has always had a strong belief in teamwork, and that working well and collaborating is the only way to win and succeed. Leading teams of people, troubleshooting and planning were a few of the fundamental principles to a project’s success that helped him to determine that the managerial track was the right career path for him to follow.

1

What experiences shaped your career?

Taking on leadership responsibilities in my previous roles gave me the confidence that I could take on a management position. The STC builds new molds and dies for various business units. My group is more focused on the mold side. When I was in the rotational program as a mold engineer, I got incredible experience, and insight as to how TE works. Being an integral part to launching new product lines  provides a much bigger oversight of why we do things certain ways. Exposure to the buisness side and not just the engineering helps us to meet cost requirements, while also building something that the plant will find success with. Keeping capital costs down is important, but you also want to build something robust enough to meet TE’s production demands for years of service.

2

What do you enjoy most about working at TE?

Every day I get to work with people from various technical backgrounds and tenures. Every day there is an opportunity to learn something new.

3

What concepts and ideas excite you?

Plastics Engineering of Injection Molds has three major aspects – Design, Tool Build and Molding. Someone coming out of a plastics engineering program similar to my background may only see one portion of the three aspects. Within TE and my group, we get a heavy dose of all three everyday. It can be difficult finding molding and plastic engineers that have all three of those needed skillsets, especially with the complexity of our products on the market. Keeping up with the industry trends and coming up with better ways of doing things is always exciting.

4

How do you predict the company will be different in two years, and how do you see yourself shaping that change?

I see the company becoming much more diverse with the change in market demands. I also see the company investing in young professionals from various backgrounds to add new thinking and ways of winning in the market. Due to this expected growth, I see an opportunity to develop in my field and take on new, exciting leadership roles.

5

What advice would you give a new candidate looking to break into the field of technology?

Don’t be afraid to take on things that may be outside your comfort zone. It’s good to have a strong background in a particular field, but you grow and learn by doing. Gaining exposure in different aspects of the business makes you a much more well-rounded employee, and helps to provide you with a better vision and insight into the direction the company chooses to go and why.

I see the company becoming much more diverse with the change in market demands. I also see the company investing in young professionals from various backgrounds to add new thinking and ways of winning in the market.
Ryan Prunty,
Manager of Manufacturing Engineering, Global Technology
Ryan Prunty
Ryan Prunty
Every day is a new challenge. It might seem so insignificant, but it will come up again in your career, so leverage it and keep it in your toolbox of skills.

As a Manager of Manufacturing Engineering, Ryan Prunty is responsible for the Design, Molding, Engineering and Inspection departments of TE’s Strategic Tooling Center in Winston-Salem, NC.  He graduated from Penn State University, The Behrend College with a B.S. in Plastics Engineering.  He started with TE in 2011 as a Manufacturing Engineer in the Rotation Program where he later began his full-time role as a Mold Engineer with the Strategic Tooling Center in North Carolina.  Ryan has always had a strong belief in teamwork, and that working well and collaborating is the only way to win and succeed. Leading teams of people, troubleshooting and planning were a few of the fundamental principles to a project’s success that helped him to determine that the managerial track was the right career path for him to follow.

1

What experiences shaped your career?

Taking on leadership responsibilities in my previous roles gave me the confidence that I could take on a management position. The STC builds new molds and dies for various business units. My group is more focused on the mold side. When I was in the rotational program as a mold engineer, I got incredible experience, and insight as to how TE works. Being an integral part to launching new product lines  provides a much bigger oversight of why we do things certain ways. Exposure to the buisness side and not just the engineering helps us to meet cost requirements, while also building something that the plant will find success with. Keeping capital costs down is important, but you also want to build something robust enough to meet TE’s production demands for years of service.

2

What do you enjoy most about working at TE?

Every day I get to work with people from various technical backgrounds and tenures. Every day there is an opportunity to learn something new.

3

What concepts and ideas excite you?

Plastics Engineering of Injection Molds has three major aspects – Design, Tool Build and Molding. Someone coming out of a plastics engineering program similar to my background may only see one portion of the three aspects. Within TE and my group, we get a heavy dose of all three everyday. It can be difficult finding molding and plastic engineers that have all three of those needed skillsets, especially with the complexity of our products on the market. Keeping up with the industry trends and coming up with better ways of doing things is always exciting.

4

How do you predict the company will be different in two years, and how do you see yourself shaping that change?

I see the company becoming much more diverse with the change in market demands. I also see the company investing in young professionals from various backgrounds to add new thinking and ways of winning in the market. Due to this expected growth, I see an opportunity to develop in my field and take on new, exciting leadership roles.

5

What advice would you give a new candidate looking to break into the field of technology?

Don’t be afraid to take on things that may be outside your comfort zone. It’s good to have a strong background in a particular field, but you grow and learn by doing. Gaining exposure in different aspects of the business makes you a much more well-rounded employee, and helps to provide you with a better vision and insight into the direction the company chooses to go and why.

I see the company becoming much more diverse with the change in market demands. I also see the company investing in young professionals from various backgrounds to add new thinking and ways of winning in the market.
Ryan Prunty,
Manager of Manufacturing Engineering, Global Technology