Craig Hornung
Craig Hornung
It is a lifetime of experience that shapes a career, not just one thing. You start young and grow by meeting challenges and working with peers, mentors and managers - all masters of their disciplines.

As an Advanced Technology Principal Engineer, Craig Hornung  collaborates with globally located, discipline and gender diverse engineering teams to develop cutting edge, high speed signal transmission products and manufacturing processes. Craig has operated in this engineering community as it has evolved from slide rule calculating to large scale cloud computing where a single Differential wire pair must cleanly transmit signals @ 40 Gbps (40 Gigabits per second).

1

What experiences shaped your career?

It is a lifetime of experience that shapes a career, not just one thing. You start young and grow by meeting challenges and working with peers, mentors and managers - all masters of their disciplines. To be sure the challenge of designing, building and implementation of tooling and systems along with the diverse set of colleagues is the main reason we get paid but you can influence what you do in the long run.

I started at AMP in a drafting position and worked through the career ladder doing mechanical drafting, design and engineering steps by following the ebb and flow of TE’s needs. I had the opportunity to apply myself by being flexible, learning on the fly while executing projects in tool design, automation design, high speed stamping, thermal management devices and mobile phone antennas prior to gaining my current position in Advanced Technology.

Along the way I met a few true gurus who were kind enough to lend me some of their knowledge so I might pass it along the next time it is needed.

2

What do you enjoy most about working at TE?

I like the diversity of the technical challenges along with the global nature of the workforce and the opportunities to advance my career. I enjoy learning and doing new things and have this can-do kind of personality when faced with a totally abstract task. TE’s management knows the problems are abstract and support my mental processes so that I am not afraid of failing initially. That helps me get through the learning phase of each task and makes me comfortable as long as it takes to solve the problem. 

3

What concepts and ideas excite you?

Moors Law states that “The number of transistors on an affordable CPU would double every two years”. I am excited to see the next disruptive evolution in processor design or signal transmission system architecture. I want to know how fast can we go using copper wires and electrical signaling. The fact that all forces and energy in the universe seem to be in the form of electromagnetic waves gets me thinking that electrons may only be one of the “fluids” that can be used for computing. What and how do we make the leap to computational speeds similar to the human brain?

4

How do you predict the company will be different in two years, and how do you see yourself shaping that change?

Our products are always getting smaller and there are physical limitations to the strength of steel tooling to withstand the forces required to manufacture these products. I have made a conscious effort to investigate and develop energy and light based machining equipment and methods like laser and electron beam cutting, joining, Infra-Red heating and Ultra Violet curing. As components get smaller and the need for precision and strength eclipses steel tools’ ability to meet the tolerance required, these photonic methods will come to the front in our global manufacturing operations.

5

What advice would you give a new candidate looking to break into the field of technology?

Make sure you like what you are signing up to do. Try to identify which of available technological disciplines you might fit best in before accepting your first position. Ask questions, try to research the job description or ask the hiring manager what his/her most pressing problem is. Read about it, think it through to figure out how you feel about working on a similar problem for years. See what gets you excited then run (don’t walk) to get into the position. 

I like the diversity of the technical challenges along with the global nature of the workforce and the opportunities to advance my career.
Craig Hornung,
Principal Engineer, Advanced Technology
Craig Hornung
Craig Hornung
It is a lifetime of experience that shapes a career, not just one thing. You start young and grow by meeting challenges and working with peers, mentors and managers - all masters of their disciplines.

As an Advanced Technology Principal Engineer, Craig Hornung  collaborates with globally located, discipline and gender diverse engineering teams to develop cutting edge, high speed signal transmission products and manufacturing processes. Craig has operated in this engineering community as it has evolved from slide rule calculating to large scale cloud computing where a single Differential wire pair must cleanly transmit signals @ 40 Gbps (40 Gigabits per second).

1

What experiences shaped your career?

It is a lifetime of experience that shapes a career, not just one thing. You start young and grow by meeting challenges and working with peers, mentors and managers - all masters of their disciplines. To be sure the challenge of designing, building and implementation of tooling and systems along with the diverse set of colleagues is the main reason we get paid but you can influence what you do in the long run.

I started at AMP in a drafting position and worked through the career ladder doing mechanical drafting, design and engineering steps by following the ebb and flow of TE’s needs. I had the opportunity to apply myself by being flexible, learning on the fly while executing projects in tool design, automation design, high speed stamping, thermal management devices and mobile phone antennas prior to gaining my current position in Advanced Technology.

Along the way I met a few true gurus who were kind enough to lend me some of their knowledge so I might pass it along the next time it is needed.

2

What do you enjoy most about working at TE?

I like the diversity of the technical challenges along with the global nature of the workforce and the opportunities to advance my career. I enjoy learning and doing new things and have this can-do kind of personality when faced with a totally abstract task. TE’s management knows the problems are abstract and support my mental processes so that I am not afraid of failing initially. That helps me get through the learning phase of each task and makes me comfortable as long as it takes to solve the problem. 

3

What concepts and ideas excite you?

Moors Law states that “The number of transistors on an affordable CPU would double every two years”. I am excited to see the next disruptive evolution in processor design or signal transmission system architecture. I want to know how fast can we go using copper wires and electrical signaling. The fact that all forces and energy in the universe seem to be in the form of electromagnetic waves gets me thinking that electrons may only be one of the “fluids” that can be used for computing. What and how do we make the leap to computational speeds similar to the human brain?

4

How do you predict the company will be different in two years, and how do you see yourself shaping that change?

Our products are always getting smaller and there are physical limitations to the strength of steel tooling to withstand the forces required to manufacture these products. I have made a conscious effort to investigate and develop energy and light based machining equipment and methods like laser and electron beam cutting, joining, Infra-Red heating and Ultra Violet curing. As components get smaller and the need for precision and strength eclipses steel tools’ ability to meet the tolerance required, these photonic methods will come to the front in our global manufacturing operations.

5

What advice would you give a new candidate looking to break into the field of technology?

Make sure you like what you are signing up to do. Try to identify which of available technological disciplines you might fit best in before accepting your first position. Ask questions, try to research the job description or ask the hiring manager what his/her most pressing problem is. Read about it, think it through to figure out how you feel about working on a similar problem for years. See what gets you excited then run (don’t walk) to get into the position. 

I like the diversity of the technical challenges along with the global nature of the workforce and the opportunities to advance my career.
Craig Hornung,
Principal Engineer, Advanced Technology