Connected Life

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Connected Life

At work and play, on and off the road, in our homes and in the air, connectivity is transforming our lives in ways that make people safer, their lives richer and paths more easily crossed.

Connected Life: When Every Connection Counts.  More information, shared by more devices, informs better decisions on everything from how to keep your home at a comfortable temperature to how to fly an airplane in

a fuel-efficient manner. Leaders from TE Connectivity (TE) will be at electronica 2016, November 8-11 in Munich, Germany, and prepared to discuss solutions for your projects in Hall B2, Booth 225 and Hall B1, Booth 233 (sensors).

Connected Life

Safe. Green. Connected

When it comes to living a connected life, Steve Rohr is certainly well-tied to the grid.

The director of technology strategy at TE Connectivity’s Transportation Solutions unit, has cameras in and around his home that can tell him who is knocking on his door from anywhere on the globe, smart thermostats he can adjust from afar before he flies home, and an in-home voice recognition system that can do everything from dim the lights in his kitchen to play a track of music.

‘’I see an enormous benefit to all of these technologies,’’ said Rohr. There are so many phenomenal applications. You can do so many different things and, yes, I admit it, I think all these things can be a lot of fun.''

Rohr’s home-centric technologies are an example of how people are now leading connected lives. In the home, in the air, at work, at school, at dinner and at the gym, the ability of devices and systems to share data allows consumers to make better, more informed decisions in every aspect of their lives, from how to get to a child’s soccer game to which seats are available at the opera to which medical specialist can perform the procedure they need.

Moreover, the connected life has led to advances that make people safer and the planet greener. Connected cars and aircraft operate safely, more efficiently and reduce harmful emissions. Connected factories allow workers to create innovative, more reliable products and to solve problems, from factory floor to garage floor, faster by understanding how consumers use the products they make. Connected trucks and industrial vehicles move freight on time and build structures faster, even under harsh operating conditions. And sensors, among an array of uses, tell drivers of congested lanes ahead, managers of smart buildings who is in them and where, homeowners of an intruder, and pilots if  thrust reversers have properly deployed.

Connected Car
Connected Car
Connected Home
Connected Home
Connected Aircraft
Connected Aircraft
Connected Factory
Connected Factory
Connected in Harsh Environments
Connected in Harsh Environments
Connected Trucks
Connected Trucks
Connected Buildings
Connected Buildings
Connected Devices
Connected Devices

electronica 2016

At electronica 2016, November 8-11 in Munich, Germany, TE will bring its broad portfolio of sensors and other products that play an important role in creating the connected life. On hand will be some of TE’s leading experts, ready to meet with you and your organization to discuss what TE can do. TE’s main exhibit will be in Hall B2, Booth 225. Its sensors solutions will be in Hall B1, Booth 233.

Terrence Murphy, director of business development at TE Appliances, will be at electronica, and says he’s prepared to discuss TE’s portfolio with attendees.

“We’re a company that can bring end to end connectivity solutions to our customers,’’ he said. ‘’Anywhere in the connected world and across multiple use cases in the home. We have the product, the quality, the reliability and the engineering expertise to solve connectivity problems for our customers, from large OEM’s to small startups looking to bring their first product to market.’

There are few environments harsher than that of the airline industry, where TE products play an important role. Broadband and satellite-based connectivity options allow airline operators to capture in-flight data about the management, health and maintenance of critical aircraft systems. Integration of sensors, connectors, relays, wire and cable, fiber optic solutions, work in concert and through harsh environments to reliably manage areas like in-flight entertainment and cabin systems, avionics and flight controls, and engine and power management.

‘’The biggest challenge is the same challenge we experience with virtually all of our technology and that is making it robust and reliable for operation on an aircraft at 35,000 feet,’’ said Russell Graves, global commercial aerospace market development manager at TE.

Electronica is widely considered the world’s leading trade fair for electronic components, systems and applications. Its vast and crowded exhibit halls, 13 in total, are home to nearly 2,800 exhibitors from more than 50 countries. They span every segment of the industry, from industrial electronics, telecommunications, energy and electro-mobility to the banking and insurance industry.

On display in TE’s booth will be its virtual transparent car, a platform developed to clearly display TE’s latest technologies to show-goers. The car has TE products for review and covers a range of topics, including power and data distribution, sensors, ambient lighting, safety systems and Hybrid and Electric Mobility. It points to the company’s focus on developing smaller, greener, lighter and smarter solutions.

It also points to TE’s role in a driver’s connected car and life. The data made available helps make decisions that can save time, money, and fuel and get driver’s to their destination in the safest way. (The U.S. Department of Transportation estimates that so-called vehicle-to-vehicle data exchanges will someday prevent 400,000 to 600,000 crashes, 190,000 to 270,000 injuries and save 780 to 1,080 lives each year.)

Suraj Alva,  senior manager-project management in TE’s Transportation Solutions unit, said the company’s experience in data communication is one way it plays a major role in the development of the connected car.

‘’Data loss is simply not acceptable,’’ he said, including in harsh environments. ‘’In the automotive space you don’t have the liberty of making mistakes. You need the integrity of the connection to be 100 percent secure. And that’s where TE, as a connector company, plays significantly. We have the engineering competency to ensure that we don’t drop signals.’’

That integrity begins, in part, on the factory floor. Andreas Woeber, TE's manager for technical business development in industrial IoT, said connected factories have machines that can trade data with each other, operators, and maintenance technicians and even learn from customer experiences with the products they make.

Information and data from quality inspections can be shared by those in the supply chain for greater understanding of product performance and reliability. Managers can review data, and suggest systems changes that boost efficiency and quality.

‘’The target is for data to connect machine and operator and factory and customer in a way that every part of the process – including tools and equipment - is optimized in a very transparent way,’’ said Woeber.