Product Development Engineer Ufuk Tüy
I am firmly convinced that the technology of machine-to-machine-communication will become a natural part of our everyday life.

Product Engineer Ufuk Tüy has been honored with an Innovation Award at TE.  It came about when a customer realized that certain requirements were very difficult to implement. Still a young engineer, he managed to invent an economical, functioning solution, for which he has now applied for a patent. Ufuk is inspired by Thomas Edison because he highlighted the failure of attempts, and his dedication to always trying new options demonstrates the true meaning of engineering. As Ufuk admits, it’s easy to understand the result, but to find the right path is the difficult bit.

1

What latest innovation do you see having the biggest impact over the next 10 years?

In my opinion, the innovation that will affect us significantly in the next ten years is the machine-to-machine-communication. Not so long ago it was even a giant leap for mankind to build and use machines. Today, a machine is taken for granted and is unimaginable without computer assistance. The technology of machine-to-machine-communication is already being applied in many industrial areas, but in my opinion it has to be further developed. This refers particularly to the field of e-mobility. I am firmly convinced that the technology of machine-to-machine-communication will affect our lives not only in the field of e- vehicles but will also establish itself as a natural part of our everyday life like connected household devices. The progress in this segment will shape the future, accompany our lives in all areas and bring the advantages that almost everything is more efficient, safer, more comfortable and more profitable as well. 

2

What is the single biggest achievement of your career?

In the engineering department we are usually faced with great challenges due to exciting projects which require development of an almost completely new product. Sometimes it happens that at first the requirements are very tough to realize. It was in such a project where the customer realized that the requirements were very difficult to implement that I, as a young engineer, managed to find a both functioning and profitable solution. Of course, I was very proud of this achievement. Due to this invention, I was honored with an Innovation Award at TE and I’ve applied for a patent for this innovative solution. 

3

What engineer do you idolize, and what are they best known for?

There have been numerous engineers and inventors who have changed the world crucially. One of them is Thomas Alva Edison Watt. What I've always particularly liked about him is that he had highlighted the failure of attempts. He justified this approach with the idea that you get closer to the solution with each failed attempt and this should motivate everyone to continue. I am always thinking of his following words:

"Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration."

This brings the true meaning of engineering to the point. It shows what really happens on a very long product development way. It is easy to understand the result, but to find the right path is not as easy as that, as Edison’s words demonstrate.

4

When did you first realize that you wanted to work in engineering, and why?

I've always been the creative one in the family who wanted to experience and question everything to the smallest detail. Especially technical devices attracted me and therefore these devices were not safe from me. The curiosity how these devices look like inside and how they work mostly ended in the breakdown of various devices (usually without the permission of my parents). The main reason for the decision to become engineer was, as simple as it sounds, an advertising poster that I saw on the way home from school. This poster read: "Engineers change the world". This sentence impressed me so much so that the decision to become an engineer came at this moment. It continues to motivate me every day to do my profession with passion. 

5

What would you do if you weren't an engineer?

I think if I would not have become an engineer, it would have taken me surely to a profession in which a lot of creativity is demanded. In particular, architecture has always been one of my favorite areas that still does not stop to surprise and inspire me. The aesthetics that can be found in every design as well as the technology that now allows to design and build buildings which are almost one kilometer high (Burj Khalifa 829.8m) are very impressive in my eyes. 

I've always been the creative one in the family who wanted to experience and question everything to the smallest detail.
Ufuk Tüy’s,
Product Development Engineer